The Importance of Employer Branding In Recruitment and How To Build A Strategy

Employer branding is an effective talent acquisition strategy which you can use to attract and retain top employees at your company. It is essentially how your organisation presents itself to employees and how they perceive you as an employer.

The Importance of Employer Branding In Recruitment and How To Build A Strategy

Employer branding is an effective talent acquisition strategy which you can use to attract and retain top employees at your company. It is essentially how your organisation presents itself to employees and how they perceive you as an employer.

Globally, 72% of recruiting experts agree that branding significantly influences the hiring process and 75% of job seekers consider the organisation’s brand before even applying for a vacancy.

Why Is Employer Branding Important?

Branding not only attracts top candidates to your organisation but it also reduces the cost per hire by 50%, according to LinkedIn. This means that your company will need to spend less capital in filling a vacancy. For instance, if your brand is well maintained, you will not need to spend a huge sum on advertising the post as top candidates already know of your reputation.

A positive employer brand can also reduce your employee turnover by 28%, which means that employees are less likely to resign. You will, therefore, be able to better retain top talent at your organisation.

How To Build A Strategy?

There are three crucial aspects to building an effective branding strategy: planning, implementation, and evaluation.

Planning

The first step is to plan how you will go about building the strategy. You need to define the objectives that you want to achieve with the branding strategy, taking into account the needs and vision of your organisation. Some of these objectives may include the following:

  • Attracting top candidates to apply for vacancies
  • Increasing retention rate of top candidates
  • Improving employee experience

Based on your set objectives, you then need to identify which resources you need. You can allocate roles and responsibilities to a team which will work on this strategy together. Ideally, your team will have people from HR, Marketing, and Communication departments.

Your team will be responsible for identifying and creating candidate personas. This means that you need to target certain types of candidates that you want to attract to your organisation. What qualifications, skills and experience do they need to have? What motivates them?

You need to make sure that your candidate personas are not biased in terms of gender, sexual orientation, race or religion.

You can then develop an Employer Value Proposition (EVP) which represents every important thing that your organisation can offer to the candidate, including salaries, employee benefits, career growth opportunities, work environment, and culture.

Once you have your EVP in place, you can develop your advertising strategies. Which platforms will you use to promote your employer branding? Can you organise a workshop? Can you host a virtual event during the current Covid-19 pandemic to attract top candidates?

Implementation

During the implementation phase, you need to regularly update your company’s website, recruitment platform, or social media to promote your employer branding. Remember to use gender-neutral language for all your job descriptions.

Make sure that your platforms are optimized for mobile recruitment as smartphones are increasingly being used by top candidates to apply for jobs. Create content that you will appeal to your candidate personas.

Ask your current and past employees for testimonials and encourage them to share their stories and experience about working at your organisation. These can be in the form of social media posts, blogs, or videos. Engage with your audience by sharing such stories online.

Make sure that you allocate resources to regularly monitor your platforms. For example, if you have a Twitter account but you do not have a current employee or a chatbot to respond to messages or Tweets, then there is no point in having a Twitter presence.

Evaluation

Every strategy needs an evaluation process in order to determine its effectiveness. During the evaluation phase, you need to use a reporting system to establish which aspects are working and which ones are not.

For example, you can monitor social media platforms on a weekly basis to check who is posting online and which topics are being discussed. If you have enabled private messaging, you need to check if all queries are being responded to. If the online engagement is positive, it means your strategy is working.

You also need to use key metrics to measure the success of your brand. You can use data such as the number of applications you are getting for each vacancy and how many candidates are accepting their job offer. If the job acceptance rate is high, it means that your organisation is on the right track with the branding strategy.

However, if you find that you are not able to achieve the objectives that you established during the planning phase, you need to review the strategy and improve it. Keep collecting data to help you identify the areas that you need to focus on.

Conclusion

Employer branding is a crucial tool in the recruitment process as job seekers tend to consider the organisation’s brand before applying for a job. If you want to hire and retain top candidates in your organisation, you need to develop an effective branding strategy.